Tag Archives: 5th Grade

5th Grade Projects

Flowing Line – Op Art

Art with Mr. E’s blog has many fun and inspirational projects and I couldn’t wait to start the year off with this fun optical illusion!  Op Art was a significant art style that arrived shortly after the era of Pop Art (the 1960’s).  Victor Vasarely and Bridget Riley have been considered the king and queen of Op Art, creating illusions that convince the audience they are moving and have depth.  It really is amazing the illusions that can be created by altering the size, shape, repetition, and colors of lines

I have put a pause on this project as it was taking more weeks than planned, but we will DEFINITELY get back to it – we have such a great start!

Our Learning Targets:

I can follow the process of creating this “illusion”, being careful to follow the same lines every time, to and from the dots.

I can use shading techniques to further the illusion of depth.

A glimpse at the process – for a closer look at how to get started click “Art With Mr. E” above 🙂

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Sugar Skulls: 2-D vs. 3-D, and Symmetrical vs. Asymmetrical 

These Sugar Skulls (calaveras) inspired by Dia de los Muertos were an extended study of two-dimensional versus three-dimensional art, as well as symmetrical versus asymmetrical design.  Because our students have the privilege of learning the Spanish language throughout elementary school, they are already familiar with the holiday of Dia de los Muertos, and it’s interesting to see their knowledge expressed in a tactile way. We practiced drawing sugar skulls using this website.

We created our 2-D, symmetrical designs by folding our skulls in half lengthwise, filling only one half of the skull, flipping over and tracing the other half with a light box (like those that display xrays – but are awesome for seeing through paper to trace!) to get a perfectly symmetrical design.

We began our 3-D, asymmetrical sugar skulls by crumpling up newspaper, wrapping with masking tape, then using paper towel strips dipped in mod podge and/or paper mache mix to create the hardened shell.  We then painted, added design with permanent marker, and sealed with gloss medium. (I loved this idea of the 3-D skull when my practicum teacher taught it!)

Our Learning Targets:

I understand the art and practices of Dia de los Muertos.

I understand that Sugar Skulls are made for Dia de los Muertos.

I can create my calavera using symmetrical design.

I can explain the difference between 2-D shapes and 3-D forms.

I can demonstrate my understanding of symmetrical and asymmetrical design.

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Abstract Color Wheels (Preview!)

I feel it’s extremely important to study color theory at each grade level, whether it’s learning basic vocabulary, mixing colors, or both.  I found this idea for an abstracted color wheel in the monthly Arts and Activities magazine.  In addition to the tints, shades, and primary and secondary colors we use in this project, we familiarized ourselves with additional color vocabulary: intermediate colors, neutral colors, warm colors, cool colors, analogous colors, complementary colors, and hue. To get to know each color on the color wheel (and a few neutral colors) a little better we did this stick activity as a whole group then in partners.

To create these abstracted color wheels students made 6 areas of roughly the same size on their whole page (we traced over the lines of these areas with colored pencil to eliminate confusion later), then within each area 5 sections were made.  Each area would then feature a primary or secondary color and two of its tints and shades.

So: 6 areas, with 5 sections each – in one area: 1 hue (main color no mixing), 2 different tints of that hue, 2 different shades of that hue – 1+2+2=5 sections

Our Learning Targets:

I understand the primary colors can be mixed to make almost all other colors.

I can mix primary colors to make secondary colors.

I can use white and black to mix tints and shades of colors.

I can use color vocabulary.

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International Dot Day – Make a mark and see where it takes You!

Because September 15th fell on a Saturday, I decided to promote International Dot Day with my students I have at my second school on Friday’s (Friday, September 14th to be exact J).  International Dot Day celebrates the book The Dot by Peter Reynolds, and urges all artists to “make a mark and see where it takes [them]”.  The Dot is about a young girl, Vashti, who is struggling with ideas and motivation in art.  Her teacher encourages her to make a mark on her paper and sign it – the next day Vashti sees her artwork (a tiny dot) nicely framed up on the wall, but knows she can do better than that (especially if it’s going to be displayed) and proceeds to make lots of dots big and small, using different colors.  It’s a very cute and encouraging book – especially for the budding artists.

To celebrate, I read and showed the YouTube video of the book, and had each grade level create a square to be included in one large collaborative piece done by the entirety of my Friday art classes.  Each square contained concentric circles inspired by Wassily Kandinsky.  See my previous lessons on Kandinsky Concentric Circles here.  The end result was a gigantic collage reaching almost floor to ceiling of concentric circles – it makes quite the statement!

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Special Note: Because I travel Fridays to a different school, I only have one kindergarten class/section my whole week.  Some of the projects we do are the same as those as I do with 1st grade, but others are solely unique to kindergarten creating!

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